What’s Next For The Toronto Raptors?

It can’t be argued against: The Boston Celtics have had a disastrous year.

Boston watched as a potential dynasty crumbled into nothing before their eyes. Kyrie Irving is a Brooklyn Net, Al Horford went to the Philadelphia 76ers and, in the wake of their respective departures, the team has undergone enough change to rock even the sturdiest of NBA foundations.

And yet, Boston has embraced that change, relished in it, even. Where others may have cowered, the Celtics stood strong and, more importantly, together, a rare occurrence from last season. While many may continue to wonder what could have been, Jayson Tatum made it clear that the team is moving on, now focused solely on the future. 

“You can’t change what happened in the past,” Tatum told reporters during the Celtics’ afternoon media day. “You can only worry about what’s next.” 

Boston did what they could to retain Irving and Horford, too. In the end, their effort was for naught but, like Tatum, the team moved on quickly. In a stroke of luck, they earned perhaps the best consolation prize they could have hoped for in Kemba Walker. 

Now, on the cusp of the season, the Celtics can start anew with Walker as their lead man. And, if only to further drive home Tatum’s point, the team’s potential fresh start was a major theme of the day. 

“I think we’re all looking forward to this season, kind of that ‘fresh start’ feel,” Gordon Hayward said. “I think, individually, each one of us had a lot to think about this summer and a lot to learn from.”

Hayward wasn’t alone in his assertion, nor Tatum in his. He, Semi Ojeleye and Marcus Smart explicitly mentioned a “fresh start,” while others referenced it. Every player seemed to agree that a second chance, along with some renewed perspective, could prove a major benefit to them as they look to rebound.

“I’m super excited, it’s like a fresh start,” said Tatum. “New team, new year, new guys.”

“The atmosphere . . . it’s a lot lighter,” said Ojeleye. “We’re cherishing this fresh start.”

“It is a fresh start for us,” said Smart. “We’ve got new faces, new mindsets, different mindsets.”

Whether a veiled shot at “a guy who shall not be named,” a legitimate team mantra, or some combination of the two, there is a lot to unpack in the two-word phrase “fresh start.” Alone, it may sound like a nothing slogan, one without substance simply used to deflect. But, given the context, it sent a powerful message that this Celtics team is going to be different.

Overzealous expectations, combined with an obsession with personal goals and an inability to cooperate burdened the Celtics greatly last season. They failed to live up to the (mainly self-manufactured) hype and as finger-pointing ensued, tensions clouded the locker room and the team spiraled out of control. The more they struggled, the further the spiral and the greater the discontent.

While it drove Irving and Horford away, it humbled those that remained. Tatum referred to it as a “teaching experience,” while Hayward said it taught him that “nothing is given to you” in the NBA. 

That shared experience should prove beneficial not only to Tatum and Hayward but to the entire team. In fact, it would already seem to be paying dividends, as it’s clear the players know they must operate on a different level this season. They know that their sole focus must be strong team-basketball and that their success will either come as a team or not at all.

No nonsense, no over-the-top expectations and no personal agendas. Just basketball.

Now, that said, it would be hard for any team in Boston’s position to rebound. There has been such a drastic change in their primary personnel that it’s almost as if they are a completely different team. Certainly, without Irving and Horford, the Celtics must find a new identity.

So, how could their “fresh start” help them achieve that? What does it really do for Boston?

Another Chance for Hayward, Tatum to Take a Leap

Part of the problem Boston faced last season was that Hayward and Tatum, both of whom were expected to play critical roles, didn’t take the necessary steps to help the Celtics succeed, Hayward in his return from a traumatic injury and Tatum in his second season.

Now, with the expectations and pressure of a title contender gone, the two have another chance to take a step forward at their own pace.

Hayward, now in his second year removed from said injury, should be close, if not back to 100% health. While he has kept his progress quiet, Hayward has been the talk of camp and, should he truly feel like himself once again, the touches should be there for him to make a major impact on offense. And, if he can play like the Celtics know he can, Hayward could push them close to the top of what is expected to be a top-heavy Eastern Conference.

Even if he should need further time to adjust, Hayward can take that time as Boston is no longer expected to be the class of the conference. Instead of forcing him into action, as they did last season, the team can do it the right way and bring him along at his own pace.

As for Tatum, he was a disappointment in his second season. But now in his third, Tatum could take that major step many thought he would thanks, in part, to the departure of Irving (and others) and the domino effect that could have on the offense.

Tatum’s struggles originated from his obsession with the midrange. If he can tone that down and emphasize the “threes and layups and free throws” in his game, as he mentioned at media day, he could see some positive regression in his offensive numbers. That, coupled with the volume he should see, could steer him to the career year many pegged him to have a season ago.

A Chance for the Rookie Class to Shine

The Celtics are in a unique position with their rookie group.

Had the Celtics maintained the core they rostered a season ago, and the expectations that would have accompanied it, many of their rookie class – Romeo Langford, Grant Williams, Carsen Edwards, Tacko Fall, etc. – might not even be on the team. In the hunt for the Larry O’Brien Trophy, teams need immediate impact, so Boston never would have had the desire nor the time necessary to foster those players and help them grow.

But now, by virtue of their conference, the Celtics can do exactly that. Boston is in the position to not only play those rookies — some more than others but play them nonetheless — and allow them to grow into themselves and whatever role it is they’ll have on the team.

Whatever growth or promise they show should only serve to further the Celtics’ long-term success. And, should the team exceed expectations, these experiences as rookies could go a long way toward helping Boston sustain that success in the future.

A Redemption Opportunity for Brad Stevens

Just as it was for the players, last season was a learning opportunity for Brad Stevens.

Given the talent on the roster, last season was Stevens’ first with “real” expectations. And, while he excelled in his usual areas of expertise, he flopped when it came time to manage the egos in his locker room. While he isn’t the sole reason for the team’s failures, he must be held accountable, at least in part, for the toxicity that was able to permeate the players and the locker room.

Like his roster’s holdovers, this “fresh start” should give Stevens the opportunity to make redeem himself. The locker room waters shouldn’t be nearly as choppy but, should any issues arise, Stevens must handle them in the proper manner before they spiral out of control.

Jaylen Brown may have summarized it the best: “My mantra, for myself and my teammates, is to just come out and hoop and see where that takes us.”

Personalities and individualities got in the way of that last season. Despite their rostered losses, if the Celtics can just hoop and grasp their golden fresh start opportunity, then they could find success sooner rather than later this season.

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